Platform 5: This week’s most important social media changes (edition 141)

Platform 5: This week’s most important social media changes (edition 141)

This week’s 5 most important social media changes

What’s changed in the last seven days? What does it mean?

Twitter’s account purge has caused significant follower drops to some profiles, Instagram is updating its two-factor authentication feature and Facebook has to deal with yet another problem: movie piracy.

Let’s take a look at these changes in more detail.

Twitter account removals have seen followers drop by up to 70%

Twitter has shown us that it is serious about cleaning up its platform. They’ve invested in anti-abuse technology provider Smyte, questioned 9.9million accounts about spamming practices and now they’ve removed all accounts from the platform that have previously been blocked for spam. This clean up has meant some accounts have lost up to 70% of their follower base.

Find out more here.

Facebook is testing info labels on branded content

As part of its shift towards greater transparency, Facebook is testing new labels on branded content that provide the viewer with more information about the parties in the partnership. These labels look very similar to the info tags that have been rolled out for political accounts.

Read more here.

Instagram is building a new, non-SMS, two-factor authentication

Traditional two-factor authentication using a mobile number isn’t as safe as it might seem. Hackers can apparently access your account by porting your number onto a new SIM card and request a password change without you knowing. To help stop hackers, Instagram is building a system that works with third-party security apps.

Learn more here.

Facebook has a movie piracy problem

Fake news, data breaches, election meddling, the list of problems Facebook has faced in recent times is long and growing. Movie piracy has become a huge problem for Facebook with users using groups to share pirated copies of movies to tens of thousands of members.

Read more here.

Facebook introduces new creative tools to Ads Manager App

If you’ve ever used the Facebook Ads Manager app, you know it can be a bit fiddly to use. Facebook is looking to fix this by introducing new creative tools for the app to make it easier for business owners and marketers to ‘create and manage their ad campaigns on the go’.

Learn more here.

Follow us on Twitter for news of these social media and content marketing changes as they happen.

Platform 5: This week’s most important social media changes (edition 140)

Platform 5: This week’s most important social media changes (edition 140)

This week’s 5 most important social media changes

What’s changed in the last seven days? What does it mean?

It’s been a busy week for all the major players with YouTube, Facebook and Pinterest introducing new features while Twitter and Instagram are both tackling spam and scam issues.

Let’s take a look at these changes in more detail.

YouTube launches a new tool for finding and removing unauthorised re-uploads

This week, a new tool has been launched to help creators protect their work. There are already a number of ways in which creators can protect their videos from copywriting fraud on the platform but this new tool will make the process more efficient by automatically scanning newly uploaded content to check if it’s a re-upload of an existing video.

More details here.

Facebook’s new AR ads allow you to try on products

Facebook has been experimenting with AR for a while now, their newest development will enable users to virtually try on different products featured in ads. This new ad format is in its early stages but Facebook is confident that it will provide brands with greater exposure to more users.

Find out more about the new feature here.

Twitter will shut down metrics for accounts previously locked as spam

Have you noticed your Twitter follower count drop in recent days? You’re not alone. Twitter is purging accounts that have been previously locked for spammy behaviour and removing them from follower metrics. Accounts with bigger followings are likely to see the most significant drops.

Read more here.

Pinterest adds new group collaboration tools

Group boards are now a thing on Pinterest. This group collaboration tool will make it easier to plan for events and functions through the app which aligns with rising user behaviour patterns on the platform. Group collaboration may not add to Pinterest’s marketing potential but it could generate greater engagement.

Find out more here.

Instagram is testing a new verification process

The sacred blue tick on Instagram has been limited to “notable” and “authentic” accounts which usually meant celebs, media outlets and big brands. But this has led to scams offering to verify your account in exchange for hundreds or thousands of dollars. To help protect users from scammers, Instagram is testing a new in-app form that allows users to request a verified profile.

More details here.

Follow us on Twitter for news of these social media and content marketing changes as they happen.

Platform 5: This week’s most important social media changes (edition 137)

Platform 5: This week’s most important social media changes (edition 137)

This week’s 5 most important social media changes

What’s changed in the last seven days? What does it mean?

Instagram has officially launched their IGTV, Snapchat added new features to their Snap Map, and Facebook has introduced a paid subscription model for groups.

Let’s take a look at these changes in more detail.

Instagram launches IGTV

Until now, Instagram has had a 60 second limit on videos. The launch if IGTV has changed that. IGTV is targeted at digital natives (those who weren’t brought up with traditional TV) and allows videos to be as long as 60 minutes.

Find more details here.

Facebook introduces a paid subscription model for groups

Facebook groups are now being used by over one billion Facebook users. A new feature is now being added to allow selected groups to set up an ongoing monthly subscription fee that would allow its users to access sub-groups that offer exclusive content. Subscriptions range from $4.99USD to $29.99USD.

More information here.

Instagram has stopped notifying people when you screenshot their stories

Back in February, Instagram started testing story screenshot notifications. Four months later, the company has announced that they will not be rolling out the feature and they have rolled back the test.

Read more here.

Snapchat adds new features to Snap Map

This week Snapchat has announced some new additions to the Snap Map which could be useful for users when they’re headed out to meet friends. ‘Weather effects’ adds animation over a friends Bitmoji based on what the weather is like at their current location. It’s a fairly minor addition and oddly timed given Instagram’s announcement but time will tell if it’s a success or not.

Find out more about other new features here.

Twitter purchases anti-abuse technology provider

Smyte, founded by former Google and Instagram engineers, offers tools that help to stop abuse, harassment and spam online. The company was acquired by Twitter this week in the hope that it could be the answer to reducing or stopping the trolls, bots and spam that has been a problem for the platform for a while now.

Read more information here.

Follow us on Twitter for news of these social media and content marketing changes as they happen.

Social Media Algorithms: How Twitter decides what you see

Social Media Algorithms: How Twitter decides what you see

This is the third instalment of Kamber’s fortnightly series on social media algorithms. This instalment follows previous research into the algorithms behind Facebook and Instagram.

Around 6,000 tweets are tweeted per second. That equates to approximately 500 million tweets being sent per day! With such high traffic on the platform, how does Twitter decipher what tweets you should be seeing?

Twitter’s timeline can be broken into three parts – ranked tweets, ‘in case you missed it’ and remaining tweets. The first two sections feature only a limited number of tweets with the bulk of what you see being displayed in the remaining tweets section. Twitter’s method behind this format is to cater for various user timeframes. It aims to show you the most important and interesting tweets in a short and concise format, while also catering to those who want to spend more time on Twitter and not miss any updates.

Algorithm breakdown

Machine Learning Algorithms (MLAs) are common among popular social media platforms such as Instagram and Facebook. Similar to these platforms, Twitter uses an MLA method, but only for the ranked tweets and the ‘in case you missed it’ section of the timeline.

An MLA aims to show you the content that will be most interesting to you. It works to eliminate what you will find irrelevant to keep you scrolling and engaging with the platform. On Twitter, this type of algorithm considers factors both about you and the tweet itself. Twitter’s algorithm aims to consider a range of factors which contribute to determining how relevant a tweet is to you. The algorithm ultimately assigns each tweet a relevancy score by considering the following factors:

  • The tweet itself – recency, the presence of media and total interactions
  • The tweet’s author – the strength of your connection to them based on your previous interactions
  • You – your previous interactions with the platform and the content you regularly search for / interact with

Now that we’ve cleared up how Twitter’s MLA broadly works, let’s look at it specific to the three parts of your timeline.

Ranked tweets

The first section you see when you open your timeline is the tweets that are categorised by their MLA relevancy score. The higher a tweet’s relevancy is, the more likely it will be displayed in this section.

This initial section focuses on your interactions with the platform. The MLA monitors what content is common amongst the tweets that you click on, retweet, comment on and like. It also monitors who you are interacting with through the platform. All this information is collated and used to determine what tweets reflect what you are interested in the most and thus, used to determine what you should see in this section.

‘In case you missed it’

Never seen this section before? Well, that’s because it is only shown to people who have been inactive on Twitter for a lengthy period of time. The aim of this section is to show you a few important tweets that may be very relevant to you but classified as ‘too old’ to be in the first section of your timeline. The MLA analyses content in a similar matter to the previous section but works with a pool of tweets that exclude tweets that will be featured in the first section as well as ones that have an older timestamp of a few hours, days or even weeks.

Remaining tweets

This section is surprisingly different from the previous two in terms of how it orders the tweets from those you follow. To order the tweets that have not been featured in the ranked tweets or ‘in case you missed it’ sections, Twitter uses a reverse chronological ordering method; the most recent at the top and then descending into older content based on the time that the tweet was posted.

Tweets that feature at least one hashtag are proven to perform 16% better than tweets without. #socialmedia Click To Tweet

On the surface, your timeline looks relatively straightforward, but behind the scenes, Twitter’s algorithm works constantly and almost instantly to provide you with the most relevant and up to date content.

Which MLA based platform do you prefer – Twitter, Instagram or Facebook?

Platform 5: This week’s most important social media changes (edition 115)

Platform 5: This week’s most important social media changes (edition 115)

This week’s 5 most important social media changes

What’s changed in the last seven days? What does it mean?

Updated news feed and more music deals for Facebook, changes to Messenger in 2018, Twitter’s new anti-abuse rules roll-out and Instagram tests text-only Stories.

Let’s take a look at these changes in more detail.

Big changes coming to Facebook’s news feed

Late last week, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg announced an overhaul to the platform’s news feed – changing the role of the product teams to help Facebook users have more meaningful interactions via content from friends… not just finding content from brands and publishers. This is expected to hit publishers which rely on Facebook for traffic and reach hard. It will also hit the reach of content (including video) from brands.

Read more about the announcement and its expected impact here, or the post from Mark Zuckerberg here.

Text-only Stories feature for Instagram

Instagram is testing a feature that allows users to post stories in text-only format (not dissimilar in appearance to those text-only updates you’re likely seeing pop up all over your Facebook feed). It was first spotted by users in Japan last year but now appears to be available to some users in Europe.

More here.

More music deals for Facebook

After sealing deals with Universal Music Group and Sony / ATV, Facebook has signed three further deals with Global Music Rights, HFA / Rumblefish and Kobalt Music Publishing. It means that tens of millions of songs will now be freely avaialble for creators to use in their videos, with artists being compensated for the use of their music.

More from Facebook here.

Twitter completes roll-out of abuse rules

In a process that started last November, Twitter has finished its series of changes aimed at halting abuse on the platform. Notable changes include new reporting tools that allow users to report posts, and to see what happens to those posts.

More here.

The year ahead for Messenger

Facebook Messenger’s David Marcus announced six trends to watch out for on the platform in 2018. Echoing sentiment from Mark Zuckerberg’s announcement of changes coming to the Facebook news feed, Marcus described the platform’s goal as making Messenger ‘the easiest and most delightful way for people to spend time together in happy and harder times’. Look out for a streamlined and simplified experience on the platform this year.

More from David’s announcement.

Follow us on Twitter for news of these social media and content marketing changes as they happen.

Platform 5: This week’s most important social media changes (edition 114)

Platform 5: This week’s most important social media changes (edition 114)

This week’s 5 most important social media changes

What’s changed in the last seven days? What does it mean?

Facebook’s music deals for creators, Instagram comments, new Twitter features for businesses and Snapchat trials Stories Everywhere.

Let’s take a look at these changes in more detail.

New music for Facebook creators

Facebook has struck deals with Universal Music Group and Sony ATV Music Publishing whereby creators can use music from the companies’ music catalogues on Facebook, Instagram, Oculus or Messenger without infringing copyright.

More about the Universal deal here and the Sony ATV Music Publishing deal here.

Instagram comment feature

In an effort to increase engagement, Instagram is testing a new comment function. If you look at a post for more than five seconds, you’ll see ‘Add a comment…’ appear at the bottom of the post. Another effort by the platform to keep your attention on the platform and delve deeper into its content.

More here.

Twitter messages updated for business

Direct Messages have been freshly updated to improve customer service and experience for businesses. The major changes include read receipts and typing indicators to help users know the status of their message.

More from the Twitter announcement.

Snapchat Stories Everywhere

Speculation that Snapchat Stories could live outside Snapchat on the web thanks to the development of a tool clled Stories Everywhere. No confirmed details yet, but if it comes to pass it will give brands and businesses more to think about in terms of the longevity of their Snapchat content and how it will translate / be consumed more widely across the web.

More on the speculation about Stories Everywhere here.

Instagram integrates further with WhatsApp

Reports that Instagram is testing a function allowing users to share their Instagram Stories direct to WhatsApp – all part of Facebook’s efforts to help users share content across their owned ecosystem (Facebook, Instagram, WhatsApp).

More here.

Follow us on Twitter for news of these social media and content marketing changes as they happen.

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