Platform 5: This week’s most important social media changes (edition 115)

Platform 5: This week’s most important social media changes (edition 115)

This week’s 5 most important social media changes

What’s changed in the last seven days? What does it mean?

Updated news feed and more music deals for Facebook, changes to Messenger in 2018, Twitter’s new anti-abuse rules roll-out and Instagram tests text-only Stories.

Let’s take a look at these changes in more detail.

Big changes coming to Facebook’s news feed

Late last week, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg announced an overhaul to the platform’s news feed – changing the role of the product teams to help Facebook users have more meaningful interactions via content from friends… not just finding content from brands and publishers. This is expected to hit publishers which rely on Facebook for traffic and reach hard. It will also hit the reach of content (including video) from brands.

Read more about the announcement and its expected impact here, or the post from Mark Zuckerberg here.

Text-only Stories feature for Instagram

Instagram is testing a feature that allows users to post stories in text-only format (not dissimilar in appearance to those text-only updates you’re likely seeing pop up all over your Facebook feed). It was first spotted by users in Japan last year but now appears to be available to some users in Europe.

More here.

More music deals for Facebook

After sealing deals with Universal Music Group and Sony / ATV, Facebook has signed three further deals with Global Music Rights, HFA / Rumblefish and Kobalt Music Publishing. It means that tens of millions of songs will now be freely avaialble for creators to use in their videos, with artists being compensated for the use of their music.

More from Facebook here.

Twitter completes roll-out of abuse rules

In a process that started last November, Twitter has finished its series of changes aimed at halting abuse on the platform. Notable changes include new reporting tools that allow users to report posts, and to see what happens to those posts.

More here.

The year ahead for Messenger

Facebook Messenger’s David Marcus announced six trends to watch out for on the platform in 2018. Echoing sentiment from Mark Zuckerberg’s announcement of changes coming to the Facebook news feed, Marcus described the platform’s goal as making Messenger ‘the easiest and most delightful way for people to spend time together in happy and harder times’. Look out for a streamlined and simplified experience on the platform this year.

More from David’s announcement.

Follow us on Twitter for news of these social media and content marketing changes as they happen.

Platform 5: This week’s most important social media changes (edition 111)

Platform 5: This week’s most important social media changes (edition 111)

This week’s 5 most important social media changes

What’s changed in the last seven days? What does it mean?

Snapchat separates brand content, YouTube’s version of ‘Stories’ arrives, new Instagram business tools, Facebook to release Messenger for kids.

Let’s take a look at these changes in more detail.

Snapchat separates branded content

For businesses publishing branded content on Snapchat, the platform will now separate friends’ content from the branded Discover content. A welcome change for users but a challenge for brands as they compete with and differentiate themselves from other branded content in the Discover feed.

More here.

YouTube targeting a piece of the ‘stories’ pie

It’s taken them longer than rivals Facebook and Instagram, but YouTube is testing ‘Reels’ – its own version of Snapchat Stories for YouTube creators. It’s another example of platforms doubling down on video features after Facebook recently launched its Creators app to help improve the live broadcast experience on the platform.

Read the YouTube announcement.

Messenger Kids on its way

Facebook has rolled out Messenger Kids in the US and will release it more widely in the app store in the coming months. The app is for children aged under 13 and will allow parents to download it to their child’s phone / tablet, create a profile for them and filter friends / family they can communicate with through the app. It will not feature any advertising and will contain safety filters to prevent certain content types (e.g. violence).

More here.

New Instagram tools for businesses

To celebrate the milestone of 25 million businesses now registered on the platform, Instagram will start to roll out new tools for businesses in the coming weeks, including insights related to how users found them. Stay tuned as these hit the platform.

More here.

Video ads coming to Facebook?

Reports that Facebook will test pre-roll ads on Facebook Watch (its platform for original content). Is this the start of ads being rolled out across Facebook videos?

Read more here.

Follow us on Twitter for news of these social media and content marketing changes as they happen.

Platform 5: This week’s most important social media changes (edition 109)

Platform 5: This week’s most important social media changes (edition 109)

This week’s 5 most important social media changes

What’s changed in the last seven days? What does it mean?

LinkedIn Career Advice mentoring, Instagram increases mobile browser function, Facebook launches Creator app for video and Trust Indicator for publishers.

Let’s take a look at these changes in more detail.

LinkedIn Career Advice

The professional social network is rolling out LinkedIn Career Advice – its formal mentoring offer which links mentors and mentees with one another. For brands and businesses it’s another opportunity to link your best and brightest with talent out there in the marketplace.

Read more about the LinkedIn feature here.

Facebook’s Creator app

Video broadcasters on Facebook now have a suite of new effects (including intros and outros) available to them thanks to the platform’s Creator app. It’s another big push by Facebook into video as it battles YouTube for views.

Learn more about Facebook’s Creator app and its features for broadcasters here.

Facebook Trust Indicator

Facebook has started rolling out Trust Indicator to publishers, a feature that will allows users to access more information about the publication / content they’re reading, including ownership, fact-checking policy and ethics policy. It’s Facebook’s latest effort to tackle the fake news issue and will roll-out more broadly to publishers in coming months.

Read more here.

Instagram Stories on your browser

To date most Instagram activity has been enabled through the app on your mobile device. With this latest change, the platform allows you to create Stories and save posts you like direct from your mobile browser on Instagram.com. That said, Instagram is yet to enable posting from desktop, but this new feature may have taken us one step closer.

Read more about the Instagram update here.

Messenger increases image resolution

With its latest update, Facebook Messenger now allows image sharing at 4K resoltion – while maintaining the speed of sending and receiving images through chats on the platform. Good news for the 17 billion images that Facebook claims are shared on the platform each month!

Read Facebook’s announcement here.

Follow us on Twitter for news of these social media and content marketing changes as they happen.

#Twitter280: does the end of brevity mean an end to creativity?

#Twitter280: does the end of brevity mean an end to creativity?

It’s been almost a fortnight since Twitter announced its expanded 280-character limit, and the dust is just beginning to settle in the Twitterverse.

The doubling of each tweet’s capacity may sound small, but with most of our brains now wired to the 140-character limit it’s no small shift.

As we all begin to shift our minds and content towards this expanded limit, we thought we’d take a moment to share the diversity of perspectives across the industry.

 

Trevor Young (aka The PR Warrior) – Zoetic Agency

Melbourne-based PR Warrior Trevor Young isn’t a fan of the changes, arguing that the 140-character limit forced us to be better communicators. His post provides a nice overview of the pros, cons and considerations the new limit now presents to communicators. Read more.

 

Catherine Wilcox – Manchester Metropolitan University

Wilcox’s view is similar to that of Young, seeing Twitter’s former brevity as an enabler of its users’ creativity – what she calls ‘the social media equivalent of a haiku’. She admits it’ll be difficult to re-wire her mind to enjoy the new experience that expanded character limit brings, but equally that this outrage will settle. Read Catherine’s piece on The Conversation.

 

Dhariana Lozano – Supremacy Marketing

Over on Social Media Today, Dharina Lozano also shares her love for the previous 140-character limit, but provides a nice, practical list of eight ways marketers can immediately consider experimenting with Twitter’s expanded limit. Worth a read and thinking about how you can try these in your upcoming content activities.

 

Angela Watercutter – WIRED

Watercutter argues that the new character limit is forcing brands and users to become creative all over again – it’s ‘the thing that took most mastery’ when Twitter launched and is giving brands and individuals a fresh chance to master a new limit and the creative scope that comes with it. She also notes that many of the positive responses to date have come from brands, and includes some early examples of how brands are embracing the change. Read her full piece on WIRED.

 

 

Platform 5: This week’s most important social media changes (edition 108)

Platform 5: This week’s most important social media changes (edition 108)

This week’s 5 most important social media changes

What’s changed in the last seven days? What does it mean?

Facebook’s new Local app, updated ad optimisation and more Stories distribution. There’s extra visual search on Pinterest and following Instagram hashtags.

Let’s take a look at these changes in more detail.

Facebook unveils new and improved Local app

This latest offering from Facebook is an updated version of its Events app, which will connect users with places and events areound them based on categories (e.g. sport,food,shopping). With users able to filter results by categories such as relevance, distance and rating, it’s never been more important to have your ratings in top shape on Facebook and your profile complete and up-to-date.

Read more here.

Instagram testing hashtag follow feature

If this test works out, people / profiles won’t be the only thing you can follow on Twitter. Instead, like using Twitter on platforms like Tweetdeck, you’ll be able to follow hashtags to stay up-to-date with specific topics and interests. If your brand’s hashtag game isn’t on-point on the platform, now’s the time to review and update to ensure your content’s included in these hashtag feeds (assuming, of course, the feature rolls out globally in the months ahead).

Read more about the test here.

Facebook’s new ad option

Advertisers just got a new Facebook tool. Aptly named Campaign Budget Optimisation, the tool will automatically allocate budget to the highest performing ad set once the campaign budget is set, meaning total campaign spend is optimised and not spent unnecessarily on under-performing ad sets within a campaign.

More about Campaign Budget Optimisation here.

Pinterest now has 3,000 visually searchable categories

The platform this week announced updates to its Lens and Visual Search capabilities, including a QR code style tool called Pincodes which will allow users scan direct from a code through to a board. It’s a timely reminder of the importance of visual search for brands in their content marketing strategy.

More on updates to Pinterest Lens and Visual Search here.

Facebook expands Stories

Brace yourself, Facebook Stories are coming to your newsfeed. The updated version of Stories launched this week and it’ll allow Stories to be linked to Events, Pages and Groups. It’ll also start delivering these Stories (including those from Instagram and Messenger) to the top of your Facebook feed – another opportunity to get timely, daily snapshots out to your community.

Read more here.

Follow us on Twitter for news of these social media and content marketing changes as they happen.

Platform 5: This week’s most important social media changes (edition 107)

Platform 5: This week’s most important social media changes (edition 107)

This week’s 5 most important social media changes

What’s changed in the last seven days? What does it mean?

New rules and expanded characters on Twitter, Facebook adds polls for Pages and Messenger chat plugin, Instagram tests tool to add older images to Stories.

Let’s take a look at these changes in more detail.

Twitter rolls-out new rules

Twitter’s latest rules come into effect this month, aiming to improve user experience and safety by clarifying how it will enforce rules relating to hate speech and harrassment. It’s been a long-standing issue for Twitter and comes as Facebook faces its own issues related to fake news and transparency.

Read more here.

Facebook polls for Pages

Facebook now allows for Pages to quiz their followers thanks to the launch of its new polling tool. Available across desktop and mobile, the tool enables brands to more easily gauge the opinion of and collect information about followers’ opinions. Time to get polling!

Read more about the new polling tool here.

Twitter’s new character limit

This week saw Twitter roll-out its new 280-character limit globally. It’s a change that sees the creative scope and space for tweets expand, while maintaining the brevity that the platform is known for. Double trouble!

Read the Twitter announcement here.

Instagram Stories testing throw-backs

The Instagram is testing a tool that will allow you to a add picture more than 24 hours old to your Instagram Stories. The feature comes with a catch though – all images older than 24 hours will be subject to a ‘date sticker’ so viewers can easily identify older images.

Read more about the test here.

New Facebook Messenger chat plugin

Facebook’s new Messenger chat plugin will allow users to initiate a Messenger chat session with a brand direct from the brand’s website. The plugin is one of Facebook’s most requested features and will support all current Messenger functions (including payments and rich media). This is great news for Messenger users and brands as it means they can connect on the platform they’re already using, rather than via an alternative chat tool.

Read more here.

Follow us on Twitter for news of these social media and content marketing changes as they happen.

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