Platform Five: This week’s most important social media changes (edition 177)

Platform Five: This week’s most important social media changes (edition 177)

This week’s 5 most important social media changes

What’s changed in the last seven days? What does it mean?

LinkedIn has introduced reactions, Instagram has begun demoting “inappropriate” content and Twitter has reduced the number of accounts users can follow in a day.

Let’s take a look at these changes in more detail.

LinkedIn introduces reactions

Following in the footsteps of Facebook, LinkedIn has introduced five new reactions to give people “more expressive ways than a Like to respond to the variety of posts [they] see in their feed.” The new reactions are Like, Celebrate, Love, Insightful and Curious.

You can read the announcement here.

Snapchat rebuilds its Android app

For years now, the Android version of the Snapchat app has been seen as inferior to the iOS version for a variety of reasons. Last year, Snap’s development team decided to completely rebuild the app rather than trying to find ad-hoc fixes. Snapchat announced that the app is finally ready for launch.

Learn more here.

Instagram has begun demoting “inappropriate” content

Back in November 2018, Mark Zuckerberg released a manifesto which discussed the need to “broadly reduce the reach of borderline content.” We’re beginning to see the first outworking of this with Instagram announcing that they have “begun reducing the spread of posts that are inappropriate but do not go against Instagram’s community guidelines.” The “non-recommendable” content includes anything that depicts violence, is graphic or shocking, or sexually aggressive.

Read more here.

Facebook introduces a Tribute section on Memorialised profiles

Memorialised accounts have been around since 2015. They allow the family and friends of those who have passed away to look back on memories and share stories. Facebook is introducing a new Tribute section which will allow people to leave messages but keep the profile’s timeline as it was before the account was memorialised.

Learn more here.

Twitter limits daily account follows to 400

The old follow-unfollow game is nothing new to any longtime Twitter users. It’s an old audience growth strategy that is still used by some business’ but predominately spammers. To help reduce the spread of spam accounts, Twitter has reduced the number of accounts you can follow from 1,000 to 400.

Find out more here.

Follow us on Twitter for news of these social media and content marketing changes as they happen.

Platform Five: This week’s most important social media changes (edition 176)

Platform Five: This week’s most important social media changes (edition 176)

This week’s 5 most important social media changes

What’s changed in the last seven days? What does it mean?

Facebook had another data issue, Snapchat may have fixed its revenue problem and Twitter has streamlined its appeal process.

Let’s take a look at these changes in more detail.

Facebook had another data leak

At this point, it’s an achievement for Facebook to go through a week without having an article worthy issue. This week, researchers discovered unprotected Facebook user data including names, passwords, interests and likes on Amazon servers. Reports say there was up to 540 million users whose data was exposed.

Read more here.

Snapchat launches Ad Kit and Audience Network

Snapchat has had a revenue problem from day one which they may finally have found a solution for. The platform will now power ads and Stories in other apps. They’ll do this through their newly launched Snapchat Ad Kit and Snapchat Audience Network which will allow them to integrate into other apps like Tinder.

Find out more here.

RIP Google+

After launching in 2011, Google+ was finally shut down on Tuesday. The social media platform never quite took off but it didn’t stop Google from trying. The final nail in the coffin was a data breach which brought forward its termination date to April 2nd. TechCrunch has put together a timeline of Google+’s triumphs and struggles over the years.

Check it out here.

Twitter adds a streamlined in-app appeal process

Everyone makes mistakes, including Twitter’s moderators because “sometimes they don’t have the full context.” In the past, if you had a tweet reported and felt it was banned by mistake, you could appeal through an online form. Now Twitter has developed an in-app appeal process which they claim can help them get back to users up to 60% faster than before.

Learn more here.

Facebook’s Ad Library will now include all active ads

Ad Library, previously known as Ad Archive, was originally designed to help people learn more about ads that are issue or politics related. Facebook has announced that it is updating Ad Library to include all active page ads that any page is running on its platform. There hasn’t previously been a central place to view all ads.

Read more here.

Follow us on Twitter for news of these social media and content marketing changes as they happen.

Platform Five: This week’s most important social media changes (edition 175)

Platform Five: This week’s most important social media changes (edition 175)

This week’s 5 most important social media changes

What’s changed in the last seven days? What does it mean?

Facebook has launched its new Ad Library, LinkedIn and Adobe are partnering up and brands will now be able to use poll stickers in their sponsored Instagram Stories.

Let’s take a look at these changes in more detail.

EU politicians have passed Article 11 and Article 13

The European Parliament has voted to pass Article 11 and Article 13, 348 votes to 274. These legislation articles will see news curation services, like Google and Apple, be taxed, meaning that outlets will generate more money for the content they produce. Article 13 will then force platforms to be legally responsible for all copyrighted content that they host.

Find out more about what these articles will mean for you here.

Facebook’s new Ad Library

Facebook has launched an Ad Library which will help users learn more about the political or issues-based ads they see running on Facebook and Instagram. The library will share information about who saw the ad, its spend, and its impressions. The library will have a history of up to seven years of ads.

Read Facebook’s announcement here.

LinkedIn and Adobe are partnering together to improve ad targeting

LinkedIn has announced its new partnership with Adobe in order to expand its audience targeting capability. The partnership will give marketing and sales teams the opportunity to gain greater insight into their target audience by using data from LinkedIn, Marketo Engage and Microsoft Dynamics 365.

Find out more here.

Instagram launches Poll stickers to Instagram Stories Ads

After launch the Poll function for Instagram stories in late 2017, Instagram has now released that brands will soon be able to use Poll stickers in their sponsored Instagram Stories. In a beta campaign, nine out of 10 campaigns recorded the Poll sticker increase the views of 3-second videos, making it a positive function for brands.

To learn how you can get started with Polls in sponsored Instagram Stories click here.

Facebook is taking a stand against white nationalism and white separatism

Following the recent terror attacks in Christchurch, Facebook announced they are putting a ban on posts which praise or support white nationalism and white separatism on Facebook and Instagram. Users who search for keywords associated with white nationalism and white separatism on will also be connected to resources that focus on helping people “leave behind hate groups”.

Learn more here.

Follow us on Twitter for news of these social media and content marketing changes as they happen.

Platform Five: This week’s most important social media changes (edition 174)

Platform Five: This week’s most important social media changes (edition 174)

This week’s 5 most important social media changes

What’s changed in the last seven days? What does it mean?

Instagram launched in-app checkout, Twitter is locking down their API and Myspace has lost all content uploaded prior to 2016.

Let’s take a look at these changes in more detail.

Instagram launched in-app checkout

eCommerce is a clear revenue opportunity for Instagram so it’s no surprise that they’ve announced that the platform now offers a complete in-app shopping experience. Starting this week, users in the US will be able to make purchases from 23 popular brands as part of a closed beta test.

Read more here.

Twitter is locking down their API

Twitter is proactively working to prevent its own data scandal by auditing developers who are accessing their API. From June 19th, “any apps that recall recent tweets or user mentions more than 100,000 times per day will need to submit their app for review.”  B2B platforms will also be required to enter a commercial licensing agreement with Twitter.

Learn more here.

Facebook introduced quoted Messenger replies

Group chats can be confusing, particularly if you’re trying to catch up on a large thread of messages which you need to respond to. To make this easier, Facebook is rolling out a new “Quoted Reply” option which will show the specific message that a user is responding to.

Find out more here.

Myspace lost all content uploaded before 2016

If Myspace wasn’t already dead, it certainly is now. The platform confirmed that they have lost every single piece of content uploaded to the platform before 2016 which includes millions of songs, photos and videos. The company is blaming a faulty server migration for the mass deletion.

Read more here.

Facebook had another privacy scandal

Another week, another data issue for Facebook. Facebook confirmed that “hundreds of millions” of passwords had been stored in plaintext for years. While Facebook says the passwords weren’t visible to anyone outside Facebook that still meant 2,000 engineers and developers could’ve seen them.

Learn more here.

Follow us on Twitter for news of these social media and content marketing changes as they happen.

Platform Five: This week’s most important social media changes (edition 173)

Platform Five: This week’s most important social media changes (edition 173)

This week’s 5 most important social media changes

What’s changed in the last seven days? What does it mean?

Twitter launched its new beta testing app, Facebook is updating its ad relevancy metrics and Instagram now lets you pause all notifications.

Let’s take a look at these changes in more detail.

Facebook suffered its longest outage in the platform’s history

For the best part of a day, apps in the Facebook family were either partially or completely out of action for different parts of the world. It took 11 hours for Facebook to resolve the issue which they have now confirmed was the result of a ‘server configuration change.’

Read more here.

Twitter launched its new beta testing app

Back in January, Twitter put a call out for users to register to be a part of their new testing program. Twttr, the new beta app, was released this week and the first round of users have had some time to play around. The first feature to be tested is a redesign of the reply thread which has been received well by most testers.

Find out more here.

Instagram rolls out ‘Pause All’ notification option

If you’ve ever wanted to turn off your Instagram notifications without actually turning off the notifications today’s your lucky day. Instagram has rolled out a ‘Pause All’ option which gives users the ability to pause all notifications from the app for between 15 minutes and eight hours. The feature is currently only available on iOS.

Learn more here.

Facebook is removing ad relevance scores

Facebook has announced that it is updating some of its ad metrics. One of these is the removal of the ad relevance score which will be replaced with three new relevance metrics: quality ranking, engagement rate ranking and conversion rate ranking. The ad relevance score will be removed from April 30.

Read more here.

Twitter introduced its new camera

At SXSW this week, Twitter revealed its newly updated camera which is designed to make it easier to “capture what’s happening in the world today.” Following in the footsteps of Facebook and Instagram, the new camera will be accessible from a swipe left and will allow users to instantly share photos, two-minute videos and live videos.

Find out more here.

Follow us on Twitter for news of these social media and content marketing changes as they happen.

Platform Five: This week’s most important social media changes (edition 172)

Platform Five: This week’s most important social media changes (edition 172)

This week’s 5 most important social media changes

What’s changed in the last seven days? What does it mean?

YouTube is introducing video fact-checking, Instagram is working on a new ad format and Facebook is battling anti-vax messaging.

Let’s take a look at these changes in more detail.

Instagram is testing video co-watching

Facebook already allows you to watch videos with friends through Watch Party. Now it looks like Instagram is trialling a similar feature. The ‘co-watch content’ feature was discovered within Instagram’s Direct Messaging code. While it’s not clear exactly how the feature will work yet, it has the potential to give IGTV a bit of a boost.

Read more here.

Google introduces shoppable ads on Google Images

Google is taking on Pinterest’s core business offering this week by announcing a new product discovery option: shoppable images. Google explains “shoppable ads on Google Images will enable businesses to highlight multiple products available for sale within their sponsored ad.”

Learn more here.

Facebook is limiting the spread of anti-vax messaging

The never-ending mission to clean up the Facebook platform continues. This time, Facebook is taking on the anti-vax messaging that has seen a steady increase in popularity in recent years. Facebook has announced several steps to help reduce the spread of “vaccine misinformation” including down ranking content and pages, rejecting ads and hiding the content from the Explore page on Instagram.

Find out more here.

YouTube is testing out a new fact-checking feature

Much like Facebook, YouTube is also trying to rid its platform of “misuse and questionable content.” The new ‘fact-check’ pop up will begin to appear on videos relating to subjects that often contain misinformation. These pop-ups will appear on the search page rather than individual videos and the videos will still be able to be searched for and watched.

Learn more here.

Instagram is working on new ‘Branded Content’ ads

Instagram has announced this week that it’s developing a new ad format which is designed to “better enable brands and influencers to partner up in a more financially beneficial, and transparent way.” This new ad format would let the influencer publish a post and then allow the advertiser to promote the post just like any other ad.

Read more here.

Follow us on Twitter for news of these social media and content marketing changes as they happen.

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