Platform Five: This week’s most important social media changes (edition 180)

Platform Five: This week’s most important social media changes (edition 180)

This week’s 5 most important social media changes

What’s changed in the last seven days? What does it mean?

Facebook held its annual F8 developer conference, a new creators guide was released for Instagram and YouTube has announced that its top priority is responsibility.

Let’s take a look at these changes in more detail.

Facebook announces plans for its platforms at F8

Facebook held its annual F8 conference this week. They used the opportunity to announce their new “privacy-focused” vision for the company and its platforms, as well as a number of updates for Facebook, Messenger, Instagram, WhatsApp and Ocular.

Read about all the updates here.

Twitter publishes May events calendar

Twitter has published its monthly calendar for May. The calendar outlines worldwide, US, Europe and Middle East events and their relevant hashtags. The calendar is designed to help marketers with their strategic planning for May.

See the full calendar here.

Facebook publishes a guide to help Instagram Creators make the most of the platform

Earlier this week, Facebook published its top eight tips aimed at how Instagram Creators can fully optimise the platform. The guide suggests Creators “keep it real”, “post frequently and get creative” and to “get closer to your fans”.

Read the full guide here.

YouTube’s CEO announces “responsibility” as her top priority

In a YouTube Creator blog post, YouTube’s CEO, Susan Wojcicki, has addressed the feedback from YouTube creators and announced that her top priority for the platform will be “living up to [their] responsibility” which is a balancing act between “maintaining an open platform with managing [their] community guidelines”.

You can read the full post here.

Facebook is introducing lead generation templates to Messenger

Over 20 billion messages are sent on Messenger each month, so it makes sense that Facebook is adding a way for business’ to generate leads from the platform. As described by Facebook, “Businesses [will be able to] create an ad that drives people to an automated question and answer flow in Messenger to learn more about what their potential customer is looking for.”

Read more here.

Follow us on Twitter for news of these social media and content marketing changes as they happen.

Platform Five: This week’s most important social media changes (edition 174)

Platform Five: This week’s most important social media changes (edition 174)

This week’s 5 most important social media changes

What’s changed in the last seven days? What does it mean?

Instagram launched in-app checkout, Twitter is locking down their API and Myspace has lost all content uploaded prior to 2016.

Let’s take a look at these changes in more detail.

Instagram launched in-app checkout

eCommerce is a clear revenue opportunity for Instagram so it’s no surprise that they’ve announced that the platform now offers a complete in-app shopping experience. Starting this week, users in the US will be able to make purchases from 23 popular brands as part of a closed beta test.

Read more here.

Twitter is locking down their API

Twitter is proactively working to prevent its own data scandal by auditing developers who are accessing their API. From June 19th, “any apps that recall recent tweets or user mentions more than 100,000 times per day will need to submit their app for review.”  B2B platforms will also be required to enter a commercial licensing agreement with Twitter.

Learn more here.

Facebook introduced quoted Messenger replies

Group chats can be confusing, particularly if you’re trying to catch up on a large thread of messages which you need to respond to. To make this easier, Facebook is rolling out a new “Quoted Reply” option which will show the specific message that a user is responding to.

Find out more here.

Myspace lost all content uploaded before 2016

If Myspace wasn’t already dead, it certainly is now. The platform confirmed that they have lost every single piece of content uploaded to the platform before 2016 which includes millions of songs, photos and videos. The company is blaming a faulty server migration for the mass deletion.

Read more here.

Facebook had another privacy scandal

Another week, another data issue for Facebook. Facebook confirmed that “hundreds of millions” of passwords had been stored in plaintext for years. While Facebook says the passwords weren’t visible to anyone outside Facebook that still meant 2,000 engineers and developers could’ve seen them.

Learn more here.

Follow us on Twitter for news of these social media and content marketing changes as they happen.

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